2022 Integrative Dermatology Symposium

Event Schedule

September 30, 2022 - October 2, 2022

Tucson, Arizona

The 2022 Integrative Dermatology Symposium will explore a wide range of topics to help treat patients from a whole-person approach.

DAY ONE: FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2022

Faculty: Co-Chairs: Hadar Lev-Tov MD and Raja Sivamani MD MS AP
Howard Maibach, MD

Faculty: Akil Palanisamy, MD

Description: Diet can potentially have a significant impact on skin conditions. This talk will present an up-to-date research review of our understanding of diet and dermatological disease, with an emphasis on the major role the microbiome plays in determining whether a patient is tolerant of or sensitive to a particular food. The talk will also provide practical tools that clinicians can use in their practice to address nutrition with patients.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will illustrate an up-to-date research review of the relationship between food sensitivities and dermatological disease.
  2. Participants will explain the key differences between food allergy, food sensitivity, and food intolerance.
  3. Participants will review the major role of Keystone bacteria in the gut microbiome in determining food tolerance and sensitivity.
  4. Participants will identify key foods such as prebiotic foods and fermented foods that support specific microbiome bacteria.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Pushpa Soundararajan, RD MBA RDN LDN AP CYI

Description: Acne is estimated to affect 9.4% of the global population. Studies show evidence that glycemic index, dairy content, dietary fats, and probiotics may play a role in acne and its treatment. Classical Ayurvedic texts mention skin diseases to be associated with incompatible foods (Virudhdha-aahara). Incompatible foods is a unique concept in Ayurveda, that leads to indigestion, bloating and gas, and doshic imbalances. It is necessary to tackle the root of the problem with proper diet by improving digestion and eliminating toxins, which is the basis of Ayurvedic nutrition. This talk will cover nutrition interventions from both systems, with emphasis on incompatible food combinations to avoid. Dietary interventions to help control or prevent Acne with practical suggestions for daily use will be presented.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will summarize at least 3 incompatible food combinations to avoid.
  2. Participants will list 3 practical suggestions for diet to control acne.
  3. Participants will recall 3 modern nutrition dietary interventions for acne.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Mark Cannon, DDS

Description: Tropism- is it still relevant? Infection specificity still exists but will pathogen infections only affect particular hosts and/or tissues? Theoretically, humankind and our microbiome co-evolve; so, many things change as our environment and diet changes. Strain shifts and lateral gene transfer (HGT) may change more than that one species. One particular pathogen, or on the other hand, one particular probiotic may dramatically alter a microbiome or specific biofilm. In addition, the changes in the hologenome seem to be the ongoing driver for evolution.

There was a common ancestor to both bacteria and viruses- viruses became simpler and bacteria more complex- and that started 3.5 billion years ago. We now have 39 trillion microbial guests living on us and in us, making us a huge cruise boat, with a substantial list of passengers (commensals), unruly passengers (pathobionts), probiotics (crew), and an occasional pathogen (pirate).

Amongst the pathogens is a “keystone” bacteria species that has become the ultimate guerrilla, capable of sabotaging our immune defenses and even hijacking our own cells for their protection and proliferation. These “keystone” pathogens are particularly virulent when they involve one of the ”Gateway” microbiomes. The oral microbiome is perhaps the most important “Gateway” microbiome and is now linked to the gut microbiome, faulty blood brain barrier, compromised immune functions and ultimately, the skin microbiome.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will define the properties of a “Gateway” microbiome and what makes the oral microbiome unique.
  2. Participants will analyze the published literature on the “keystone” pathogen often described as a “guerilla” that compromises the integrity of the oral “gateway” microbiome.
  3. Participants will list the prebiotics and probiotics that inhibit this pathogen and prevent systemic inflammation and intracellular invasion.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Peter Lio, MD

Description: There are numerous evidence-based alternative modalities to treat atopic dermatitis. In this course you will learn about an integrative approach for treating atopic dermatitis.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will describe some of the various integrative treatments available for atopic dermatitis.
  2. Participants will create a comprehensive treatment plan for atopic dermatitis in both adults and children.
  3. Participants will summarize some of the pitfalls of these treatments.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Lawrence Eichenfield, MD

Description: There is a steady stream of new information about atopic dermatitis epidemiology, disease impact, comorbidities, and new and evolving therapeutics. This update on pediatric AD will attempt to relate important research work and help to translate this into best clinical practices.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will recall the impact of AD in children and adolescents including comorbidities.
  2. Participants will apply the appropriate placement of new topical therapies in regimens of care for pediatric AD.
  3. Participants will measure the ease of directing shared decision making on utilizing systemic therapies for pediatric and adolescent AD.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Philip Werschler, MD

Description: In this lecture, attendees will learn about the complexity and burden of skin and joint involvement for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), Review SKYRIZI’s clinical trial profile including long-term data for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, Explore SKYRIZI’s clinical trial profile for the PsA indication and Analyze SKYRIZI’s safety profile across plaque psoriasis and PsA indications.

Non-CME

Faculty: Jason Ezra Hawkes, MD MS FAAD

Description: Provide an overview of the normal function of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway within cells. We will also discuss the research and clinical efforts that led to the development of small molecules that inhibit this intracellular pathway, known as JAK inhibitors, and their potential therapeutic role for chronic inflammatory conditions such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Finally, we will compare and contrast this novel class of medications to current FDA-approved therapies in psoriasis (e.g., efficacy, onset of action, overall safety, and common adverse events).

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will describe the normal function of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway within cells and its role in transmitting a variety of biological signals.
  2. Participants will discuss the research and clinical efforts that underscore the potential role and benefit of JAK inhibition in the treatment of inflammatory conditions, such as psoriasis.
  3. Participants will compare and contrast this novel class of medication with current FDA-approved therapies in psoriasis, such as traditional immunosuppressants and biologics.
  4. Participants will summarize the current knowledge about the efficacy, clinical profile, overall safety, and most common adverse events seen with JAK inhibitors.

 

CME: 0.5

Moderator: Hadar Lev-Tov, MD MAS
Panelists: Lakshi Alderdge, MSN RN ANP-BC; Jason Ezra Hawkes, MD MS FAAD; Joseph Alban, DAc

Description: Psoriasis is a complex disease and management is not a linear process. To understand how different aspects of disease management come together into a harmonious and coherent treatment regimen, an interdisciplinary panel will discuss the various aspects of disease management. Using a case-based discussion, the panel will review the various aspects of treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will evaluate the treatment options for mild psoriasis.
  2. Participants will assess the treatment options for moderate-severe psoriasis.
  3. Participants will recall how to collaborate with other clinicians for the treatment of moderate-severe psoriasis.

 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Robert Lustig, MD MSL

Description: Lifespan (years of life) and healthspan (years of disease-free life) continue to decline due to increases in chronic diseases. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cancer, dementia, fatty liver disease – these chronic diseases have treatments, but they do not have cures. Specific medications may mitigate the symptoms, but not the disease itself. The reason is that these “diseases” are not the real disease. Rather, they are the manifestations of eight underlying subcellular pathologies. These pathologies — glycation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, membrane instability, inflammation, methylation, autophagy — are common to chronic disease. These are clearly manifest in the dermatologic phenomena that attend aging. However, there are no medications that effectively deal with any of them. Rather, changes in food consumption has the power to mitigate each of these pathologies to increase both lifespan and healthspan.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will demonstrate that chronic disease therapy only treats symptoms, not the actual disease process.
  2. Participants will describe the eight subcellular pathologies that belie all chronic disease, and how they contribute to morbidity and mortality.
  3. Participants will explain that these subcellular pathologies are foodable but not druggable.
 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Hadar Lev-Tov, MD MAS

Description: Dermatologists create and treat wounds every day and are experts in controlling the disease severity. But what about the wounds present/created? Let’s put a lid on it! In this workshop, learners will have the opportunity to learn about the different classes of dressings and compression therapy via hands-on exploration. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will appraise the different classes of dressings.
  2. Participants will recall the basic classification of wounds.
  3. Participants will examine the use of compression therapy.

 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Keira Barr, MD

Description: The common denominator amongst the most prevalent skin ailments affecting women’s health is stress. This workshop provides an experiential and evidence-based approach for how mind-body strategies might be used to help reduce disease severity, exacerbation frequency, and adverse effects of treatment in these conditions. Stress has multiple and wide-ranging physiologic and psychologic impacts on skin disease through the effect of locally secreted hormones and mediators that affect skin integrity, inflammation, and healing potential. Although we might talk to our patients about stress management, teaching them HOW to do it is the most powerful prescription typically missing from every skincare regimen. This workshop will teach you simple, effective, and transformative practices you can use starting Monday morning. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will evaluate the role of trauma and stress on the most common skin issues affecting women.
  2. Participants will manage skin disease like acne, atopic dermatitis, hair loss, and melanoma with a mind-body approach to reduce disease severity, exacerbation frequency, and adverse effects of treatment.
  3. Participants will practice and experience mind body interventions that will help balance women’s hormones.

 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Sheila Farhang, MD

Description: Cosmetics procedures, specifically filler injections, are essential to dermatological practice. Assessing facial aging and restoring volume safely and naturally is key. Learn safe and innovative mid cheek and tear trough revolumization and rejuvenation techniques using filler.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be able to list facial danger zones and recall facial anatomy.
  2. Participants will be able to review clinical evidence for the use of filler in the mid cheek and tear through area.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and practice facial assessments.
  4. Participants will be able to summarize mid cheek and tear through facial aging and the use of facial fillers.

 

CME: 1.0

DAY TWO: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2022

Faculty: Iltefat Hamzavi, MD

Description: This lecture will cover the new therapeutic developments for the treatment of vitiligo including novel topical non-steroidal therapies as well as evidence for the relationship to stress.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will categorize the different forms and presentations of vitiligo.
  2. Participants will recall the key features that distinguish unstable from stable vitiligo.
  3. Participants will discuss existing and emerging treatment options for vitiligo.
  4. Participants will describe the role of the JAK pathway in vitiligo and the evidence for the use of JAK inhibitors.
  5. Participants will evaluate the evidence for the use of nutritional supplements in the treatment of vitiligo.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Neal Bhatia, MD

Description: Rosacea is not just skin deep; there are significant inflammatory responses in motion that involve the barrier, microbiome, and the relationship with the gut. Even more than just flushing and redness, there are many pathways of inflammation that involve neurovascular events, cascades of cathelicidin activations and different cell lines, and new understandings of the role of triggers. Antibiotics including topical applications have significant impact on the process but have potential consequences in the GI tract when doses are not appropriate for inflammation instead of an infection. The discussion of approaches to treatment goes beyond therapies to include non-prescription treatments, diet modification, and avoidance of triggers: all difficult initiatives for today’s rosacea patients.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will evaluate the multiple pathways that contribute to the pathogenesis of rosacea.
  2. Participants will review the impact of topical and oral therapies as well as new vehicles and other approaches to the maintenance and treatment of rosacea.
  3. Participants will analyze and review the correlation of the skin and gut in management strategies of rosacea.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Michael Traub, ND DHANP FABNO

Description: Increasing evidence suggests that the gut-skin axis is implicated in the pathogenesis of rosacea. Sufficient data exists to support the concept that the gut microbiome plays a role in the inflammatory cutaneous response and there appears to be associations with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. A dysbiotic microbiome and an innate immune system dysregulation contribute to the pathophysiology of rosacea. Greater understanding of this connection between the gut-skin axis could allow for more efficacious and timely treatment.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will review the basics of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: diagnosis, risk factors, testing, and integrative management.
  2. Participants will define the prevalence of SIBO and Helicobacter pylori in rosacea.
  3. Participants will review the clinical evidence for the use of rifaximin in rosacea.
  4. Participants will examine the pitfalls of treating SIBO and Helicobacter pylori.

 

CME: 0.5

Moderator: Raja Sivamani, MD MS AP
Panelists: Joseph Alban, DAc; Neal Bhatia, MD; Michael Traub, ND DHANP FABNO

Description: This panel will explore several cases of acne and rosacea with an interdisciplinary expert panel.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will discuss the role of different forms of benzoyl peroxide in acne and rosacea.
  2. Participants will recall the role of probiotics and supplements in the treatment of acne and rosacea.
  3. Participants will describe the role of nutrition in influencing acne and rosacea.

 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Kathy Farah, MD FAAFP

Description: The itch-scratch-pain cycle causes significant distress in those suffering from a multitude of dermatologic and allergic conditions. Mind-Body skills, such as diaphragmatic breathing and mindfulness can reduce these symptoms. Experience these skills for yourself and those you serve. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will define Mind-Body Medicine.
  2. Participants will explain the use of Mind-Body skills with pain and itch.
  3. Participants will practice Mind-Body skills. 

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Steven Gurgevich, PhD

Description: History and folklore are rich with mind/body methods to treat warts. This presentation provides clinical cases of hypnotherapy to remove warts in pediatric and adult patients. Contrasting strategies and methods of hypnotherapy illustrate the underlying elements for therapeutic success. These are easily learned and integrated within medical practice. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will describe two contrasting strategies of hypnotherapy.
  2. Participants will name and describe the essential ingredients that empower therapeutic suggestion.
  3. Participants will identify two sources of professional training in clinical hypnosis for physicians.

 

CME: 0.5

Moderator: Jessica Maloh, ND
Panelists: Apple Bodemer, MD; Keira Barr, MD

Description: The mind and body are an indivisible unit, as evidenced by the impact of psychological stress on acne, hair loss, and even barrier function and wound healing. Furthermore, research demonstrates that various skin conditions are associated with increased levels of anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Learn about various mindfulness techniques that can support clinical disease outcomes, and quality of life.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Participants will discuss the prevalence and impact of stress, anxiety, and low mood in clinical dermatology cases.
  2. Participants will distinguish between various mindfulness techniques, their effect on dermatological conditions, and quality of life.
  3. Participants will explain the use of acupressure in supporting the mind-body connection.

 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Andrew Weil, MD

Description: Modern scientific medicine has advanced rapidly, but those advances have not resulted in better health or health care. Ignoring the healing power of nature and the organism’s intrinsic mechanisms of healing have made us dependent on therapeutic interventions requiring very expensive technology. The future of medicine is integrative – that is, the thoughtful combination of conventional and alternative ideas and practices. Integrative medicine takes advantage of natural healing, treats whole persons (bodies, minds, spirits), considers all aspects of lifestyle in matters of health and illness, honors and supports the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, and makes use of all appropriate therapies, using simpler, low-tech methods when possible. Promising trends in health care and its challenges will be shared, as will Dr. Weil’s vision for integrative medicine 10 – 20 years from now. He will also discuss the particular relevance of integrative medicine to the field of dermatology.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will summarize the reasons for the uncontrolled rise of healthcare costs.
  2. Participants will explain the role of Integrative Medicine in a cost-effective health care system that meets the needs of our society.
  3. Participants will review the importance of Integrative Medicine in the management of common dermatological conditions.

DAY THREE: SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2022

Faculty: Hemali Gunt, PhD

Description: Learn more about the role of skin microbiome, its importance in maintaining skin barrier and the impact of skin care products on skin’s environment.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will understand the natural balance of skin microbiome and moisture barrier.
  2. Participants will recognize why a disrupted microbiome can be a problem.
  3. Participants will discuss clinical/scientific data of skin care products that protect skin microbiome from disruptions.

 

Non-CME

Faculty: Cassandra Quave, PhD

Description: Plants have served as the fundamental basis for human pharmacopeia since ancient times. There are an estimated 374,000 species of plants on Earth, and roughly 9% of all plant life (33,000 species) have been used in some form of traditional medicine. Although the legacy of plants as sources of medicine is long, we have only recently begun to apply modern scientific tools to uncover how botanicals work in mitigating skin disease. Dr. Quave searches the world for plants used in traditional systems of medicine to treat infectious and inflammatory skin diseases, including skin and soft tissue infections, acne, and atopic dermatitis. She offers insights from her research conducted on more than 700 medicinal plant species. She explores some of the different ways plant-derived natural products influence skin health through manipulation of the skin microbiome.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Participants will review the mechanisms of action of botanicals for inflammatory skin disease.
  2. Participants will list examples of botanicals used in traditional medicine for skin health.
  3. Participants will describe how plant natural products influence the skin microbiota.

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Sandra Chiu, LAc

Description: According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons’ “2020 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report,” interest in non-surgical, minimally invasive cosmetic procedures has far exceeded surgical procedures in recent years. In step with this trend, Chinese medical cosmetic treatment also continues to gain interest. Learn about the key tools and strategies employed in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to address common cosmetic concerns like wrinkles, declining skin laxity and elasticity, facial shape changes, and skin hydration. Examine the strengths of TCM cosmetic strategies in comparison to popular non-invasive Western treatments like radio frequency, fillers, neurotoxin, etc. Evaluate integrative scenarios of how the Western and TCM approach can work together, and when one might be preferred over the other. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will recall how TCM practitioners use acupuncture, gua sha, cupping, and moxibustion to treat common cosmetic concerns like wrinkles and fine lines, weakening of skin elasticity and collagen production, and facial shape changes due to aging.
  2. Participants will review research examining the efficacy of facial acupuncture for various anti-aging treatment goals.
  3. Participants will compare and contrast TCM cosmetic treatment to popular Western anti-aging procedures from facelifts to fillers.
  4. Participants will assess integrative opportunities utilizing both Western and TCM treatment options.
  5. Participants will evaluate scenarios when Western options might be preferred over TCM strategies, and vice versa. 

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: Hadar Lev-Tov, MD MAS

Description: HS is a tough disease to manage. Drugs and lifestyle changes alone are often not enough to achieve remission. Surgical management is often needed and simple office-based procedures can make a big difference in outcomes. However, many clinicians are intimidated. It is time to be a holistic doctor for your HS patient! Shake off the hesitation, roll up your scrubs, and get to work! In this session, simple office-based procedures will be reviewed. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will recall how to perform surgical interventions in HS in addition to medical care.
  2. Participants will appraise the benefits of surgical procedures in HS.

 

CME: 0.5

Moderator: Hadar Lev-Tov, MD MAS
Panelists: Brindley Brooks; Steven Daveluy, MD

Description: It’s late in the day and the last patient of the clinic is behind the treatment room door. Your assistant says the dreadful word: HS! But do you really need to fear HS? In this session, HS experts will share their experience in making the HS visit a rewarding experience for the clinician and the patient alike. Using a case-based approach, the panel will discuss principles of management utilizing medications, lifestyle adjustments, mind-body techniques, and surgical procedures.  

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will evaluate the treatment options for people with HS.
  2. Participants will create their treatment paradigm to fit all aspects of management. 

CME: 1.0

Faculty: Lindsay S. Ackerman, MD

Description: Step Into Possibility and Discover Olumiant for a new indication. Please join us for a presentation about efficacy and safety information for the latest indication approved for Olumiant (baricitinib).

Non-CME

Faculty: Apple Bodemer, MD

Description: Hair represents so much more than just a covering for our scalps. It is seen as a significant social signifier for most cultures. While it may not be surprising that hair loss commonly causes significant stress, stress itself can contribute to the initiation of a variety of types of hair loss. This talk will explore the relationship between stress and hair loss. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will describe the ways hair loss can cause stress.
  2. Participants will identify stressors that can lead to hair loss.
  3. Participants will summarize the importance of stress management in helping people deal with hair loss. 

 

CME: 0.5

Faculty: DiAnne Davis, MD FAAD

Description: Although certain hair care techniques are common in the black community, with some promoting ease of everyday hair styling for black women, many of these practices have been implicated as risk factors for several types of both non-scarring and scarring alopecia. By increasing the knowledge and understanding of these practices, clinicians can better manage different forms of alopecia, patient expectations, and help to stop the progression of hair loss before it becomes permanent. This information can be used to develop individualized recommendations for safer styling alternatives and improve patient education by identifying high-risk hair styling habits.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will identify different curl patterns.
  2. Participants will review hair style practices in ethnic populations.
  3. Participants will analyze high risk hairstyling habits.
  4. Participants will employ tips and tools for one to better manage dermatologic conditions affecting the scalp. 

 

CME: 0.5

Moderator: Apple Bodemer, MD
Panelists: DiAnne Davis, MD FAAD; 

Description: Experts in the hair loss space will gather to share wisdom and pearls for helping people suffering from hair loss.  

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will define new ways of approaching people with hair loss.
  2. Participants will differentiate types of hair loss.
  3. Participants will discuss hair loss with patients or clients.  

CME: 1.0